New Books! 10/13/15

New in Hardcover

City on Fire by Garth Risk Hallberg

“…a big, stunning first novel and an amazing virtual reality machine, whisking us back to New York City in the 1970s, that gritty, graffitied era when the city tottered on the brink of bankruptcy, when the Bronx was burning and Central Park was a shabby hunting ground for muggers, and the Son of Sam was roaming the streets. Punk rock was being born downtown and starving artists could still rent garrets in Midtown. Vinyl was the music delivery system of choice, writers still wrote on typewriters, researchers relied on microfilm, and no one anyone knew had a cellphone. Although Mr. Hallberg is only 36, he’s somehow managed to evoke all this — and the cacophonous soundtrack that played in those years — with bravura swagger and style and heart.” – The New York Times Garth Risk Hallberg will speak & sign in our store Thursday, October 22 at 7PM.

Unfaithful Music & Disappearing Ink by Elvis Costello

“‘Songs can be many things,’ Elvis Costello writes in his new autobiography: ‘an education, a seduction, some solace in heartache, a valve for anger, a passport, your undoing, or even a lottery ticket.’ “Mr. Costello’s book…manages to be all these things, and a pint of Guinness and a bag of chips. It’s streaked with some of the best writing – funny, strange, spiteful, anguished – we’ve ever had from an important musician.” – The New York Times Tickets for our October 20 event are still available in-store and online

Felicity: Poems by Pulitzer Prize winner Mary Oliver

“If I have any secret stash of poems, anywhere, it might be about love, not anger,” Mary Oliver once said in an interview. Finally, we can immerse ourselves in Oliver’s love poems, where great happiness abounds. Our most delicate chronicler of physical landscape, Oliver has described her work as loving the world. With Felicity she examines what it means to love another person. She opens our eyes again to the territory within our own hearts.

Thirteen Ways of Looking: Fiction by Colum McCann

“Mr. McCann is a writer of power and subtlety and beauty best known for his National Book Award-winning novel Let the Great World Spin. The four stories here…differ widely from one another. But they are connected by a tension, an unease, a threat, a sense that things are off kilter but perhaps can be put right if the characters, and the reader, understand them more fully.” –The New York Times

They All Love Jack: Busting the Ripper by Bruce Robinson

“Just when you thought you’ve read all you’re ever gonna read about Jack The Ripper, an 800 page tome by Bruce Robinson comes along. There is no way I’m not reading a Jack The Ripper book by the writer/director of Withnail & I. Described as “…a literary high-wire act reminiscent of Tom Wolfe or Hunter S. Thompson, THEY ALL LOVE JACK: BUSTING THE RIPPER is an expressionistic journey throught the cesspools of late-Victorian society…” THIS BOOKS IS GOING HOME WITH ME TODAY!”–Joe T.

Face Paint: The Story of Makeup by Lisa Eldridge

“Smart, elegant and articulate, Lisa Eldridge runs, in my opinion, the best beauty blog on the internet. Her intellect infuses all of her work, so it was no surprise that she decided to tackle the history of her art form in her first book, rather than putting together a simple how-to manual (see lisaeldridege.com for all that!) This is both a history of style and a social history—a must-read for the informed makeup wearer.” -Kaitlyn

New in Paperback

Let Me Be Frank With You by Richard Ford

In his trio of critically acclaimed, bestselling novels–The Sportswriter, the Pulitzer Prize and PEN/ Faulkner-winning Independence Day, and The Lay of the Land–Richard Ford, in essence, illuminated the zeitgeist of an entire generation, through the divinings and wit of his now-famous literary chronicler, Frank Bascombe, who is certainly one of the most indelible, provocative, and anticipated characters in modern American literature.Here, in Let Me Be Frank With You, Ford returns with four deftly linked stories narrated by the iconic Bascombe. Now sixty-eight, and again ensconced in the well-defended New Jersey suburb of Haddam, Bascombe has thrived–seemingly if not utterly–in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy’s devastation. Richard Ford will speak & sign at BookPeople Tuesday, October 27 at 7PM.

The Penguin Arthur Miller: Collected Plays

In the history of postwar American art and politics, Arthur Miller casts a long shadow as a playwright of stunning range and power whose works held up a mirror to America and its shifting values. This collection celebrates Miller’s creative and intellectual legacy by bringing together the breadth of his plays, which span the decades from the 1930s to the new millennium. From his quiet debut, The Man Who Had All the Luck, and All My Sons, the follow-up that established him as a major talent, to career hallmarks like The Crucible and Death of a Salesman, and later works like Mr. Peters Connections and Resurrection Blues, the range and courage of Miller’s moral and artistic vision are here on full display.

The Rap Year Book: The Most Important Rap Song from Every Year Since 1979, Discussed, Debated, and Deconstructed by Shea Serrano with a forward by Ice-T

The Rap Year Book takes readers on a journey that begins in 1979, widely regarded as the moment rap became recognized as part of the cultural and musical landscape, and comes right up to the present. Shea Serrano deftly pays homage to the most important song of each year. Serrano also examines the most important moments that surround the history and culture of rap music from artists backgrounds to issues of race, the rise of hip-hop, and the struggles among its major players both personal and professional. Complete with infographics, lyric maps, hilarious and informative footnotes, portraits of the artists, and short essays by other prominent music writers, The Rap Year Book is both a narrative and illustrated guide to the most iconic and influential rap songs ever created.

The Case Against Satan by Ray Russell

A must read classics for this Halloween season. “The Case Against Satan predates The Exorcist as one of the first novels about exorcism and it’s author, Ray Russell, was not just a master of mid-century gothic horror but also the fiction editor at Playboy in the 50’s and was responsible for publishing authors such as Ray Bradbury and Kurt Vonnegut.” -Joe T.

Perchance to Dream: Selected Stories by Charles Beaumont

Another must read classics for this Halloween season. “Charles Beaumont was, alongside Rod Sterling & Richard Matheson, one of the essential writers for the Twilight Zone. Perchance To Dream reprints many of the classic short stories that inspired some of the best episodes of that classic show. “ -Joe T.

Zen Pencils-Volume Two: Dream the Impossible Dream by Gavin Aung Than

The second volume of Zen Pencils comics takes more of your favorite inspirational quotes and poetry and transforms them into heartwarming cartoon stories. Featuring quotes of revered minds including Isaac Asimov, Maya Angelou, Kahlil Gibran, Robert F. Kennedy, and William Shakespeare plus celebrities such as Amy Poehler, Jim Henson, and Kevin Smith, wise words are given a new lease on life through the medium of comics. This collection also includes a pull-out poster and an all-new 16-page story from creator Gavin Aung Than.

How to Be Both by Ali Smith

“I love it when a book’s content reflects its style, which is exactly what Ali Smith has done with her clever new novel. The story is split into two parts, and each half’s main characters explore and create their own identities – just as Smith has done with the book as a whole. It’s a beautiful look at art, love, loss, and the ties that bind us all.”— Consuelo

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