Teen Thursday: 02.15.2018

Sightwitch

If you’re worried about having enough time to read Sightwitch before Susan Dennard comes next week, don’t fret — the book is on our shelves now! You can pick it up today and bring it in for the event on Tuesday, February 20 at 7 p.m. Don’t forget to check out our interview with Susan!

Here are the details on the book:

Before Safi and Iseult battled a Bloodwitch … Before Merik returned from the dead … Ryber Fortiza was a Sightwitch Sister at a secluded convent, waiting to be called by her goddess into the depths of the mountain. There she would receive the gift of foretelling. But when that call never comes, Ryber finds herself the only Sister without the Sight. Years pass and Ryber’s misfit pain becomes a dull ache, until one day, Sisters who already possess the Sight are summoned into the mountain, never to return. Soon enough, Ryber is the only Sister left. Now, it is up to her to save her Sisters, though she does not have the Sight — and though she does not know what might await her inside the mountain. On her journey underground, she encounters a young captain named Kullen Ikray, who has no memory of who he is or how he got there. Together, the two journey ever deeper in search of answers. Their road is filled with horrors, and what they find at the end of that road will alter the fate of the Witchlands forever.

 

NEW RELEASES

Honor Among Thieves by Rachel Caine and Ann Aguire: Petty criminal Zara Cole has a painful past that’s made her stronger than most, which is why she chose life in New Detroit instead moving with her family to Mars. In her eyes, living inside a dome isn’t much better than a prison cell. Still, when Zara commits a crime that has her running scared, jail might be exactly where she’s headed. Instead, Zara is recruited into the Honors, an elite team of humans selected by the Leviathan — a race of sentient alien ships — to explore the outer reaches of the universe as their passengers. Zara seizes the chance to flee Earth’s dangers, but when she meets Nadim, the alien ship she’s assigned, Zara starts to feel at home for the first time. But nothing could have prepared her for the dark, ominous truths that lurk behind the alluring glitter of starlight.

When Light Left Us by Leah Thomas: When the Vasquez siblings’ father left, it seemed nothing could remedy the absence in their lives … until a shimmering figure named Luz appeared in the canyon behind their house. Luz filled the void. He shot hoops with seventeen-year-old Hank’s hands. He showed fourteen-year-old Ana cinematic beauty behind her eyelids. He spoke kindly to eight-year-old Milo. But then Luz left, too, and he took something from each of them. As a new school year begins, Hank, Ana, and Milo must carry on as if an alien presence never altered them. But how can they ever feel close to other people again when Luz changed everything about how they see the world and themselves? In an imaginative and heartfelt exploration of human — and non-human — nature, Leah Thomas champions the unyielding bonds between family and true friends.

Hamilton and Peggy: A Revolutionary Friendship by Laura Malone Elliot: Peggy Schuyler has always felt like she’s existed in the shadows of her beloved sisters: the fiery, intelligent Angelica and beautiful, sweet Eliza. But it’s in the throes of a chaotic war that Peggy finds herself a central figure amid Loyalists and Patriots, spies and traitors, friends and family. When a flirtatious aide-de-camp, Alexander Hamilton, writes to Peggy asking for her help in wooing the earnest Eliza, Peggy finds herself unable to deny such an impassioned plea. A fast friendship forms between the two, but Alexander is caught in the same war as her father, and the danger to all their lives is real. Everything is a battlefield — from the frontlines to their carefully coded letters — but will Peggy’s bravery’s and intelligence be enough to keep them all safe?

Between the Lines by Nikki Grimes: Darrian dreams of writing for the New York Times. To hone his skills and learn more about the power of words, he enrolls in Mr. Ward’s class, known for its open-mic poetry readings and boys vs. girls poetry slam. Everyone in class has something important to say, and in sharing their poetry, they learn that they all face challenges and have a story to tell — whether it’s about health problems, aging out of foster care, being bullied for religious beliefs, or having to take on too much responsibility because of an addicted parent. As Darrian and his classmates get to know one another through poetry, they bond over the shared experiences and truth that emerge from their writing, despite their private struggles and outward differences.

 

TEEN PRESS CORPS IS LOVING…

prince and dressmaker

The Prince and the Dressmaker by Jen Wang

“Reading The Prince and the Dressmaker was like watching an episode of Project Runway while reading The Gentleman’s Guide to Vice and Virtue and eating a box of Sweethearts. Actually, no. It was much, much better. (Also, reading while watching T.V. sounds like epic multitasking gone wrong.)”

Ivy (TPC Member)

 

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