What We’re Reading 7/29

Hey there, readers! Have you just turned the last page of a novel? Is your to-be-read stack looking a little low? Never fear! Our booksellers are back with new recommendations so you can keep on reading.


 

 

9781984806734

Beach Read by Emily Henry

Beach Read was the exact palette cleanser I needed during this crazy time. It is a novel about a struggling author who goes to her now deceased father’s second home on a lake to try to pull herself out of a fit of writer’s block. Only, it isn’t working. That is until she meets her neighbor, a man she knew in college who is a fellow author she has always secretly considered to be her rival. Turns out he is also suffering from writer’s block, so a bet forms: she’ll write a dark literary fiction he is known for and he will write a story with a happy ending. I mean, you can only imagine what ensues. This read is realistic while still being a nice gooey escape from our current reality.

–Lojo

 

 

9781635572957

Why I’m No Longer Talking to White People About Race by Reni Eddo-Lodge

Reni Eddo-Lodge gives us detailed accounts of history and current events in a way that textbooks never did: with emotional context. She doesn’t just explain the history that drives our current systemic racism, she also provides quotes, interviews, and anecdotes that make that history tangible. You’re not only learning the history, you’re living through the pain felt in the past and it will fuel you to do everything you can to recognize it and prevent it from happening again. While this book focuses on the UK, it’s immensely helpful to see how systemic racism manifests in other countries to understand just how adaptive and parasitic it is. There are a lot of trending anti-racist books right now, but I’ve made it a priority to read books by Black authors and it was doubly exciting and needed to find a whole chapter on feminism and intersectionality.

–Gina

 

 

9781439123102

Beating Back the Devil by Maryn McKenna

Wonder about the CDC? McKenna not only fills us in about the origin and basic structure of the Center for Disease Control, but follows CDC protocols through several epidemics that demonstrate the strenghths and weaknesses of this critical government office!

— Griffin

 

 


Can’t get enough of our bookseller recs? Find these and so many more online at BookPeople.com!

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